Category Archives: Design

The best inventions of 2016, according to TIME magazine

Written by Alex Gray Senior Writer, Formative Content
Published Friday 16 December 2016
A man plays a video game with Sony's PlayStation VR headset at Tokyo Game Show 2016 in Makuhari, east of Tokyo, Japan, September 15, 2016.

From an artificial pancreas to a life-saving potato … some of TIME magazine’s top 25 inventions
Image: REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Every year TIME magazine publishes a list of what it considers to be the year’s 25 great inventions. This year’s selection covers a broad range of ideas, from a levitating light bulb to shoes that tie themselves.

And some of them are truly life-changing.

1. Uneven football fields

Who says a football field has to be rectangular? Thai property development company AP Thailand has turned unused and unevenly shaped spaces in Bangkok into football fields.

The Unusual Football Field was first developed in the Khlong Toei community, a highly populated area in Bangkok. If found unused but awkwardly sized spaces and converted them into spots where schoolchildren could go to play the nation’s favourite sport.

This video shows how the company converted the spaces to give children a valuable outlet, and why they did it.

Image: AP Thai

2. A roof over their heads

For years, the Swedish furniture group IKEA has been designing functional and affordable furnishings. But it has also been solving problems outside the home.

The company has supported the work of Better Shelter, an organization that, with the help of the IKEA Foundation and the UNHCR, has created a safer and more durable shelter for refugee families around the world.

Better Shelter in Kara Tepe, Lesvos

Image: Better Shelter

The Better Shelter is designed to last for at least three years and is suitable for areas in which local materials or construction workers are in short supply. It is “a ground-breaking example of democratic design form, function, quality, sustainability and an affordable price,” says the IKEA Foundation.

But they can provide more than homes for refugees. They act as registration centres, medical facilities and food distribution points in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Middle East.

“The refugee housing unit is an exciting new development in humanitarian shelter … Its deployment will ensure dramatic improvement to the lives of many people affected by crises,” says Shaun Scales, Chief of Shelter and Settlement, at UNHCR.

3. A life-saving potato

Food – its quality, quantity, availability – is one of the biggest issues of our time.

The World Food Prize is a Nobel-like international award that recognizes achievements of individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food in the world.

This year’s winners are four people who, between them, have developed a nutrient-rich vegetable and helped to extend the reach of food crops whose nutritional quality has been improved.

Three members of the team, Dr Maria Andrade of Cape Verde, Dr Robert Mwanga of Uganda, and Dr Jan Low of the United States, have created a sweet potato enriched with vitamin A. Deficiency in vitamin A contributes to high rates of blindness, diarrhoea, immune-system disorders and premature death in children and pregnant women in Africa. The potato is “the single most successful example of micronutrient and vitamin biofortification,” say the award organizers.

 World Food Prize Laureates 2016

Image: World Food Prize

The fourth winner of the award, Dr Howarth Bouis, has been recognized for pioneering the concept of “biofortification” – improving the nutritional content of a food – and turning the idea into a global movement.

“Through the combined efforts of our four Laureates, over 10 million persons are now positively impacted by biofortified crops, with a potential of several hundred million more having their nutrition and health enhanced in the coming decades,” say the World Food Prize panel.

4. Artificial pancreas

The number of diabetics worldwide is expected to double in the next 20 years to 700 million, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

Diabetes occurs when the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin, or the body cannot effectively use the insulin that it does produce.

Without insulin, sugar can build to harmful levels in the blood. This can cause damage to all our major organs, from our hearts to our kidneys. It can also cause blindness, impotence and infections that can result in amputation.

It’s a chronic disease that impacts the daily lives of its sufferers, who have to regularly check their blood sugar levels.

In September of this year, a new device was approved for use by the Federal Drug Administration in the US.

The MiniMed® 670G system is an insulin pump that automatically adjusts the delivery of insulin based on its sensor, which measures blood-sugar levels every five minutes. The company says it aims to help people living with Type 1 diabetes “spend less time managing their disease and more time enjoying life”.

 The MiniMed 670G system

5. Artificial limbs

Colombia’s 50-year civil war turned it into one of the most heavily landmined countries in the world. Many children have borne the brunt, losing their lives or surviving with lost limbs.

IKO Creative Prosthetic System

Image: IKO

Colombian-born designer Carlos Arturo Torres took the typical prosthesis design and viewed it from the eyes of a child. ‘What if kids could make their own prosthetics?’ he asked himself.

The result is the IKO Creative Prosthetic System, an adaptable prosthesis designed on the back of extensive research into how children feel about wearing a prosthesis. It is both functional – it has a functioning hand attachment – and convertible into a toy. It has a LEGO space ship with a laser and a remote-controlled digger arm that can be attached instead.

“Missing a limb shouldn’t be a disability for a kid when you have the opportunity to explore and augment their potential by creating, playing and learning,” says Torres, “It’s all about kids being kids.”

6. The fundraising Power Band

Wearable fitness devices have been one of the hottest products of recent years. Now there is one that aims to solve two problems at once: reducing obesity among children in wealthier nations while also helping children at risk of starvation in poorer ones.

Created by the Ammunition Group, the UNICEF Kid Power Band encourages children to get active and earn points. The points are converted into funding used by UNICEF to deliver lifesaving packets of therapeutic food to severely malnourished children around the world.

To date, the UNICEF Kid Power Team has earned more than 12 million Kid Power Points, enough to unlock more than 5.1 million packets of therapeutic food.

Image: UNICEF

7. Cleaner air

The World Health Organization says the number of deaths attributed to air pollution is 6.5 million a year. That’s more than the number of people killed by HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and road injuries combined.

Wynd is a portable air cleaner that monitors the air around you and purifies where needed. It removes dust, allergens, smoke, and pollution from your personal space, in a device that is the size of a water bottle.

 A portable air cleaner

Image: Wynd Technologies

It has been created by Wynd Technologies, Inc., a start-up based in California. Founder Ray Wu often travelled to Asia, where poor air quality is a well-known problem. “We created Wynd out of a need to create clean environments for ourselves and our families wherever we go,” says the company.

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[Info] 22 coisas que pessoas criativas fazem diferente. Quem é criativo vai entender a maioria.

Pessoas criativas são diferentes. Você já deve ter percebido que aquele seu amigo que tem umas ideias malucas se diferencia dos outros em muitas características.

Ou melhor, se você for uma pessoa criativa vai entender o que estou falando só de ler os itens a seguir.

O site Just Something levantou 22 características de pessoas criativaspara tentar entender o que as fazem tão especiais… ou pelo menos diferentes.

Se você quer ser um pouco mais criativo, ou atiçar seu raciocínio, talvez seja uma boa seguir essa lista.

1. PESSOAS CRIATIVAS SE INSPIRAM NAS HORAS MAIS IMPROVÁVEIS

A verdade é que ninguém sabe quando a próxima grande ideia vai chegar. Isso também serve para os criativos, mas eles sabem que uma hora a ideia chega. Sem mais nem menos, ela chega.

2. ELES SONHAM ACORDADO

Os criativos podem estar onde quiserem a qualquer momento. Calma, não estou falando de teletransporte. Eles simplesmente se perdem em suas próprias imaginações… e o pior, isso pode acontecer enquanto conversam com você. Faz parte.

Pessoas criativas (11)

Fonte: tumblr.com

3. ELES FICAM ENTEDIADOS FACILMENTE

É impressionante como essas pessoas precisam de estímulos quase que constantes para se manterem ativos e alertas. É muito difícil que consigam prestar atenção em algo que não estão interessados. Déficit de atenção ou não, isso faz parte dos criativos.

4. ELES ENXERGAM O MUNDO COM OS OLHOS DE UMA CRIANÇA

Uma parte deles nunca amadurece e isso talvez seja o real segredo para a criatividade. Eles observam o mundo com os olhos curiosos de uma criança.

Pessoas criativas (10)

Fonte: justsomething.co

5. ELES VÃO FALHAR… ASSIM COMO VÃO TENTAR NOVAMENTE DEPOIS

Criatividade não significa que você está imune a falhas e erros. Assim como as outras pessoas, os criativos também sofrem derrotas na vida… mas o grande segredo é que eles não param em qualquer rejeição. Eles levantam e tentam de novo.

6. ELES ESCUTAM QUE DEVEM ARRUMAR UM TRABALHO DE VERDADE

Muitos criativos não se animam com trabalhos convencionais. Eles querem algo novo, diferente, desafiador… e isso pode ser motivo para sempre ouvir que devem procurar um trabalho de verdade. Meh.

Pessoas criativas (9)

Fonte: coolwebsitedesigns.org

7. ELES SEGUEM SEUS CORAÇÕES

Há quem diga que as pessoas criativas têm uma tendência de assumir mais riscos e não se preocupar com problemas. Isso pode trazer inúmeros desafios, mas também muito mais satisfação.

8. ELES SE PERDEM NO TEMPO

Não há nada mais prazeroso para os criativos do que criar algo que realmente importe para eles. Isso pode fazer com que esqueçam de comer, beber e até dormir. Quando as ideias fluem, nada mais importa.

Pessoas criativas (8)

Fonte: crystalkidbabyshark.com

9. ELES TRABALHAM QUANDO OS OUTROS ESTÃO DORMINDO… E DORMEM QUANDO OS OUTROS ESTÃO TRABALHANDO

Os horários convencionais não se encaixam na agenda dos criativos. Eles fazem as coisas quando é melhor para eles.

10. ELES ENXERGAM OPORTUNIDADES ONDE OS OUTROS VEEM DIFICULDADES

A maioria dos criativos sabem que o copo está meio cheio.

Pessoas criativas (7)

Fonte: emlii.com

11. ELES SE APAIXONAM POR SUAS CRIAÇÕES EM UM DIA E NO OUTRO AS ODEIAM COMO NUNCA ANTES

Isso é um mistério, mas há algo que deixe os criativos inconstantes sobre seus trabalhos.

12. ELES ODEIAM SUAS CRIAÇÕES EM UM DIA E NO OUTRO ESTÃO COMPLETAMENTE APAIXONADOS POR ELAS

Assim como o #11. Uma loucura.

Pessoas criativas (6)

Fonte: flickr.com

13. ELES SÃO HUMILDES E ORGULHOSOS AO MESMO TEMPO

Pessoas criativas sempre estão dispostas a aprender, mas são extremamente orgulhosos quando se trata de suas ideias.

14. ELES ESTÃO SEMPRE À PROCURA DE NOVAS FORMAS DE SE EXPRESSAR

A busca por novidades nunca para. Qualquer que seja o criativo, ele sempre vai procurar (e encontrar) novas formas de expressar o que pensa e sente.

Pessoas criativas (5)

Fonte: whicdn.com

15. ELES PROCRASTINAM

Eles vão cumprir horários e entregas, mas é provável que tudo fique para o dia anterior. Ou para as últimas horas.

16. ELES VEEM O OUTRO LADO DA MOEDA

Os criativos sempre observam situações de diferentes pontos de vista.

Pessoas criativas (4)

Fonte: emlii.com

17. ELES NÃO GOSTAM DE LIMITES

Regras e limites, definitivamente, não foram feitas para criativos. É por isso que algumas vezes eles são vistos como rebeldes.

18. ELES NÃO COSTUMAM GOSTAR DE NÚMEROS

Tente obrigar pessoas criativas a estudar matemática e veja como eles odeiam números.

Pessoas criativas (3)

Fonte: francoisebertieaux.be

19. ELES SÃO GRANDES OBSERVADORES

Qualquer coisa pode servir de inspiração para os criativos, por isso estão sempre observando pessoas e situações. Até os mínimos detalhes.

20. ELES ESTÃO SEMPRE BUSCANDO NOVAS EXPERIÊNCIAS

Fugir da rotina é uma ótima maneira de se manterem motivados. Lembra do #3?

Pessoas criativas (2)

Fonte: jornaldoempreendedor.com.br

21. ELES RECOMEÇAM TUDO DE NOVO

O recomeço não é um medo de pessoas criativos. Se algo não está bom, recomeçar tudo de novo de um jeito melhor não é um problema.

22. ELES AMAM

Eles amam a vida, as pessoas, os animais, a natureza… eles amam tudo que é belo e puro. O amor dos criativos pela vida é contagiante e realmente pode transformar relacionamentos. Fique próximo de pessoas criativas, eles vão fazer sua vida um pouco mais interessante.

Pessoas criativas (1)

Fonte: youthvoices.net

Essa lista foi feita para pessoas criativas, mas eu digo que também é para aqueles menos criativos, porque no fim todos nós somos criativos. Cada um a sua maneira. 😉

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[Info] 5 Things I Learnt as a Designer at LEGO

Jonathan Bree 🚀Follow Industrial design, UX, product strategy and startups. Maker. London. Nov 17

At 5am on a cold, misty morning, my plane tumbled to a stop in a strange land where I didn’t speak a word of the language. I was about to embark on one of the best (and most bizarre) adventures I’d had so far — working as a designer at LEGO HQ in Denmark.

I was fresh-faced, just a few weeks after finishing university, and about to be thrown into the deep end of my first real design job.

Over the course of my time there, I would work on a secret project, a real life ‘LEGO House’ — a 12,000 square meter new spiritual home for the cult brand, standing 23 meters tall. The ‘House’ was to be filled with slightly surreal digital and physical experiences showing the values and future vision for LEGO.

The LEGO House in progress, construction expected to be completed in the latter half of 2017.

That sink-or-swim experience influences much of my approach today. Here are the top five things I picked up in between all of the pickled herring, liquorice-flavoured everything, and hygge*.

*Don’t ask.

1 — Every point of the experience matters

Often as a designer or entrepreneur, the focus is on the product, testing learning and shipping — however, the product is merely one piece of the experience puzzle. Where are the users when they interact with it? What were they doing before? How did they discover it? What will they do after? These are all part of the broader product experience. Every product, whether it may seem like it or not, is a service of some kind, and needs to be considered holistically within the user’s journey.

At LEGO, the approach is to actually map the experiential journey that the product or service will exist within and seek to understand how that can be made better.

Below is one of the tools LEGO uses to plot the user’s mood across the various touch-points of the journey, diving into how the user feels and their situation at any one moment.

Every pain point is an opportunity to be won or wasted, and can add to the product experience… or easily subtract from it.

2 — Build play in

For a product to be truly sticky, it needs to be more than functional, connecting on an emotional level — to be a joy to use… like, actually fun.

Of course, this doesn’t mean throwing unnecessary animations in left, right and centre. The user’s path to completing a goal within the product should never be impeded by pointless fluff, but there are always novel ways to accomplish a task or fun elements can be embedded into the experience.

This is a key part of the LEGO philosophy; embed little surprising moments of play into everything. Although perhaps this isn’t surprising for a toy company. However, this approach is now being applied in markets where it wouldn’t have in the past — take the popular example of Slack, which sits in the ever so lively enterprise communication space… with other fun products like… Lync and Yammer. At the end of the day, any product will be used by real people, so building small moments of delight (what designer Oki Sato calls ‘!’ moments) can be the difference between success or sighs.

Some nice examples:

Product Hunt tells you to go to bed if you’ve been browsing too long. Credit: Muzli

When Google Chrome can’t connect to the internet, users can pass the time playing a tree-hopping dinosaur game until they’re reconnected. Credit: omgchrome
If you click MailChimp’s high five hand too many times, it starts to turn red. Credit: Little Big Details

3 — Think with your hands, not just your head

Make it real. At LEGO, I had the pencil snatched out of my hand and was told – don’t sketch it… build it.

You can perceive the form and functionality of anything so much better once you make it more tangible, and realising something in physical form is one of the best ways of doing this.

Foam models and paper prototypes may seem crude and childlike next to CAD or wire-framing tools, but absolutely nothing beats sense-checking in the real world — the sooner something can be tested, the sooner it can be improved. Something that is astoundingly obvious when you are holding a physical model in your hand and trying it out may be completely lost in the 2D world of a computer screen or on paper.

Get it off the paper.

4 — Don’t be afraid to dismantle to find a better way

Sometimes the only way to fix something… is to take it apart and start again.

When something doesn’t work, it is all too easy to try to fall into the trap of simply fixing it, which will get you back on track as quickly as possible. But this misses the real opportunity, which is to actually re-build with a new understanding of the previous design’s weaknesses.

Just as with making something out of LEGO; it’s always quicker to create something a second time, because your understanding of it runs a little deeper. You know where the awkward parts are, so you can change your approach.

Although it can seem crazy or painful to start again or intentionally break apart something that you put time into creating, the end result will be all the better for it.

5— Simplicity is strength

In the same way that Twitter’s famous 140 character limit frees people from the burden of producing a masterpiece, (and led to significant growth in its early years) LEGO frees people to build quickly, effectively — but most importantly, roughly.

Roughly? Lower fidelity lowers the barrier to entry — everyone can try and anyone can succeed. There is no wrong way to connect simple plastic bricks, and no wrong way to tweet. It is a playground safe from failure. It is much in the same way that many are hesitant to draw in front of a group or are put off by the pressure of a blank page (just think about how often you hear the phrase: “but I can’t draw!”). Whilst drawing may offer more scope and depth, there also comes the perception that someone can miss the mark… creating a subconscious barrier to entry.

Less allows for more.

6 — Allow the plan to change

Yep, I know… I said 5 at the start. But sometimes you have to be prepared to change the plan or break the old structure when it no longer fits or works the given task. Sometimes you don’t know exactly what you are about to create or what the outcome will be, and that’s ok. Let the plan change.

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[Info] A sinistra mansão de A Família Addams ganha réplica em versão LEGO

Garotas Geek 

lego-familia-adams-mansao-destaque

Uma família estranha, surpresa é tamanha, são cheios de artimanha, os Adams vem aí!

Quem conseguiu ler a frase a cima sem cantar a música mentalmente e estalar os dedos? Bom, eu pelo menos não consigo. A Família Addams encantou (e assombrou) gerações e mais gerações de fãs. E agora eles ganharam um belo tributo ao último episódio lançado da série original The Addams Family que foi ao ar em 1966, 50 anos atrás. Hugh Scandrett cresceu com a família Addams, adora a série, e fazer construções de LEGO é um de seus hobbies favorites. Então ele decidiu juntar essas duas paixões para construir a mansão dessa excêntrica família, e o resultado ficou de deixar a gente de boca aberta.

lego-familia-adams-mansao-1

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O projeto foi publicado no LEGO Ideas, e já ganhou os 10 mil votos necessários, ou seja, tem grandes chance da LEGO vender o produto para o público em geral  (e ele ganhar uma porcentagem dos lucros). Hugh conta que levou mais de 5 meses, com várias sessões semanais, para finalizar a mansão. Ele assistiu à série diversas vezes e foi tirando screen shots de toda cena que ele poderia usar como referência.

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QUERENDO, SIM OU CLARO?

Você pode saber mais sobre a mansão da Família Addams na página do projeto, e também pode conferir a entrevista que Hugh deu ao LEGO Ideas.

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[Design] COMO IMPRESSIONAR EM CATÁLOGO DE PAPEL?

Iain Glynn inovou ao criar um jeito diferente de apresentar a linha de papeis Sirio Ultra Black para a Fedrigoni. Ele criou uma embalagem com papeis da linha, de diversas gramaturas, dobrados de forma a recriar objetos de estilo e chamou a caixa de “The new black”. Muito criativo e bacana, não acham? Confiram nas imagens abaixo e boa golada inspiradora!

75484f25402279-56344b820330a2b3bb725402279-56344b820d48073d9e325402279-56344b821455e41d0c725402279-56344b8240cc4e5b60525402279-56344b8266089ca150125402279-56344b825ef3069015e25402279-56344b8249df4a4f5c525402279-56344b8239143ec987725402279-56344b8256f33

http://designontherocks.blog.br/como-impressionar-em-catalogo-de-papel/

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[Info] Tailandeses criam sistema solar-hidrogênio para construir casas autossuficientes

21 de novembro de 2016 • Atualizado às 16 : 45

O escritório tailandês CNX Construction criou um sistema inovador para que residências e escritórios sejam mantidos inteiramente a partir de energias renováveis, independente das condições do clima. A novidade utiliza sistemas de aquecimento e produção de energia solar e também através do hidrogênio.

A primeira casa a receber a estrutura em sua concepção foi a Phi Suea House, que funciona totalmente independente das redes de transmissão e tem energia renovável disponível durante as 24h do dia e no ano inteiro.

Foto: Divulgação

Enquanto o sol está brilhando, a estrutura conta com painéis fotovoltaicos funcionando a toda força. Segundo a empresa, as placas produzem 326,8kWh de média diária de energia. O que não é usado no abastecimento comum da casa, é destinado ao sistema que separa as moléculas de água, para gerar energia através do hidrogênio.

Foto: Divulgação

Graças a essa mescla de fontes, a casa consegue produzir energia mesmo nos dias mais nublados ou durante a noite. Além disso, o uso de aquecedores solares para água e da arquitetura bioclimática ainda no desenho do projeto, fazem com que a estrutura tenha um baixo consumo energético.

Foto: Divulgação

Toda a energia produzida é direcionada a um sistema central de controle, que também conta com uma bateria para armazenar eletricidade para casos de emergência.

Redação CicloVivo

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[Info] This is not a map

Customers will always surprise you with the creative ways they use your product. It’s not deliberate on their behalf though. They’re just adapting your product to their needs.

Peter Drucker is famous for saying “The customer rarely buys what the company thinks it’s selling”. The implication of this quote is that to improve a product you must first understand what it is being used for.

Let’s explain with an example.

Not long after we launched Intercom, we added a map feature, so you could see where your customers were around the world.

It was a classic “this is pretty cool but we don’t know why” type feature. And we could see by its traffic, it became popular quickly. But marketing the map as a feature was difficult, because it was hard to work out why you’d use it.

  • Work out where you had most customers? Nope, lots of products already do that.
  • See who is in a given city? No, our user list does that much better.
  • See how many users you have in a given country? No, our user list does that better too.

So what does it do, aside from look impressive? We looked at 3 ways it was used:

People like to show it off at trade shows & conferences (see the laptop)

People like to show it off on Twitter:

People like to show it off to investors:

So what does it do? It looks impressive. It makes our customers look impressive. That’s what it does.

Improvement based on usage

If we tried to improve the map before we knew how it was used, we’d try to make a better map. Here’s the types of things we would have focussed on:

  • geographical accuracy
  • clustering
  • better country/city borders
  • drag to create “regions”
  • various other cartographical improvements

All of those “improvements” would have taken us weeks/months and would have resulted in a worse product. Because the customer wasn’t buying what we thought we were selling. It’s not a map. It’s a show piece.

What would make it better at that job?

  • A map that’s designed to look good, first and foremost
  • A map that hides sensitive data automatically, making it shareable
  • A map that’s easy for customers to share

So that’s exactly what we created. As of this Monday we offered our customers the chance to publicise a beautiful animated map, and gave a unique shareable URL to them:

A worse “map” does a better job

When you focus purely on how a feature is used, ignoring the “category” it’s in, or “type of feature” it is, you quickly learn how to improve it, and those improvements resonate immediately…

Look here for even more customer reaction to the shareable map.

Credit to Hongyuan for design and Eoin and Patrick for developing the feature. If you’ve any feedback or thoughts on it they’d love to hear it.

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